September 27, 2022

‘You’re going to be late’: Warne’s final moments revealed as foul play ruled out

He played 145 Tests in total over a 15-year career, taking 708 wickets, and was also a useful lower-order batsman, with a highest Test score of 99.

Australia cricket legend and the greatest leg-spinner of all-time, Shane Warne, has died, aged 52.

The 708-Test wicket great was found unresponsive by friends in a villa he was staying at in Koh Samui, Thailand.

Warne’s management released a brief statement in the early hours of Saturday (AEDT) saying that he passed away of a suspected heart attack.

“Shane was found unresponsive in his villa and despite the best efforts of medical staff, he could not be revived,” the statement reads.

“The family requests privacy at this time and will provide further details in due course.”

According to the Herald Sun, attempts by Warne’s close friend and associate Andrew Neophitou to revive him were unsuccessful.

Neophitou was an executive producer behind the recently released documentary SHANE.

Staff at the Thai International Hospital told AFP in Bangkok that Warne’s body was taken to their facility around 6:00 pm local time (1100 GMT) from Samujana Villas, a luxury resort in the northeast of Koh Samui.

“No foul play was suspected at the scene based on our investigation,” Thai police told AFP.

Warne’s manager James Erskine revealed Warne was in Thailand at the beginning of three months off having spent the summer working for Fox Cricket on the Ashes.

“Shane was having three months off and this was the start of it,” he told the Remembering Shane Warne tribute on Fox Cricket.

“They had only arrived the night before.

“They were going to go out for a drink at 5 o’clock, and (Neophitou) knocked on his door at 5.15pm because Warnie was always on time and said “come on you’re going to be late” and then realised something was wrong.”

Erskine said Neophitou then attempted to perform CPR before the ambulance arrived to take Warne to hospital but he was pronounced dead shortly after.

Foreign Affairs Minister Marise Payne, meanwhile, confirmed Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade officials had been in touch with Warne’s travelling companions, and would travel to Koh Sumai to “provide further assistance”.

Warne has been taken to a local hospital for an autopsy, and will then be repatriated ahead of an expected state funeral.

“DFAT is working with Thai authorities to confirm arrangements following his passing, assist with his repatriation, and provide other assistance on the ground,” Senator Payne said.

The Great Southern Stand at the MCG will be renamed the S.K. Warne Stand, the Victorian government has confirmed on Saturday while Warne’s family will be offered a state funeral, as Prime Minister Scott Morrison describing him as one of the nation’s greatest cricketers and characters.

Warne has been taken to a local hospital for an autopsy, and will then be repatriated ahead of an expected state funeral.

“DFAT is working with Thai authorities to confirm arrangements following his passing, assist with his repatriation, and provide other assistance on the ground,” Senator Payne said.

The Great Southern Stand at the MCG will be renamed the S.K. Warne Stand, the Victorian government has confirmed on Saturday while Warne’s family will be offered a state funeral, as Prime Minister Scott Morrison describing him as one of the nation’s greatest cricketers and characters."King of Spin" In his own words

“Australians have woken in shock and sadness to the awful news of the death of Shane Warne, aged just 52,” Mr Morrison said.

“Shane was one of our greatest cricketers of all time, one of only a few that could approach the extraordinary achievements of the great Don Bradman.”

His achievements were the product of his talent, discipline and passion for the game he loved,” the Prime Minister said.

“But Shane was more than this to Australians. He was one of our nation’s greatest characters.

“His humour, his passion, his irreverence, his approachability ensured he was loved by all.”

The news is the second devastating blow for Australian cricket in 24 hours with fellow great, Rod Marsh, also dying on Friday having suffered a major heart attack last week.

Just hours before his death was made public, Warne tweeted his sadness over the death of Marsh who was one of his cricket idols.

Warne, credited with reviving the art of leg-spin, was part of a dominant Australian Test team in the 1990s and 2000s and helped his country win the 1999 limited-overs World Cup.

Australian captain Pat Cummins, currently leading the team on a tour of Pakistan, said Warne was “a hero” to the current generation of cricketers.